Orlando Criminal Defense Lawyer

If you have been charged with any type of criminal offense in Orlando please contact Chris S. Boatright, P.A. at 407-740-8300 to discuss what options may be available to get your criminal offense dismissed or reduced.  One way to get your criminal offense dismissed is by completing a Pre-Trial Diversion program.  Not every criminal offense case is eligible for a Pre-Trial Diversion program.  

Former Prosecutor

As a former prosecutor Chris has an understanding of what can be important to the prosecutor in your Orlando criminal offense case.  It is important to understand how the other side works.  Chris uses this understanding to determine what needs to be done to get the best possible outcome in your criminal offense case.  

Orlando Criminal Defense Lawyer Since 1999

Chris has been defending individuals in Orlando charged with criminal offenses since 1999.  Being an Orlando criminal defense lawyer for so long has given Chris the opportunity to spend a lot of time working with the judges and prosecutors in Orlando that handle criminal cases like yours.  Experience dealing with those judges and prosecutors is important in achieving the best results in your criminal case.  

Different Orlando Criminal Defense Lawyers Get Different Results

When you have been charged with any type of criminal offense in Orlando you need an aggressive, experienced, and knowledgeable lawyer like Chris to defend you.  A criminal conviction will stay on your record forever, therefore, it is important to be represented by the right lawyer.  The better prepared you are for your court appearance the more likely it is you will get a favorable outcome.  The best results possible are rarely obtained by just hoping for them.  Get the help you need at Chris S. Boatright, P.A. to get the best results possible.  

Information About Orlando Criminal Charges

There are many different types of criminal charges. Some of most common criminal charges prosecuted in Orlando are possession of drug paraphernalia, loitering or prowling, carrying a concealed weapon, carrying a concealed firearm, carrying a concealed firearm in a place prohibited by law and dealing in stolen property charges. 

Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

Drug Paraphernalia means all equipment, products, and materials of any kind which are used, intented for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, re-packaging, storing, containing, concealing, transporting, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of Florida Statutes.  Possession of Drug Paraphernalia is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 1 year in jail and/or 1 year on probation and/or a $1,000 fine.

Possession may be actual or constructive.  Actual possession means the drug paraphernalia is in the hand of or on the person, or the drug paraphernalia is in a container in the hand of or on the person, or the drug paraphernalia is so close as to be within ready reach and is under the control of the person.  Mere proximity to the drug paraphernalia is not sufficient to establish control over that drug paraphernalia when the drug paraphernalia is not in a place over which the person has control.  Constructive possession means the drug paraphernalia is in a place over which the person has control, or in which the person has concealed it.  If the drug paraphernalia is in a place over which the person does not have control, in order to establish constructive possession the State must prove the person’s control over the drug paraphernalia, knowledge that the drug paraphernalia was within the person’s presence and knowledge of the illicit nature of the drug paraphernalia.

Loitering or Prowling

It is unlawful for any person to loiter or prowl in a place, at a time or in a manner not usual for law- abiding individuals, under circumstances that warrant a justifiable and reasonable alarm or immediate concern for the safety of persons or property in the vicinity. Loitering or Prowling is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 1 year in jail and/or 1 year on probation and/or a $1,000 fine.

Among the circumstances which may be considered in determining whether such alarm or immediate concern is warranted is the fact that the person takes flight upon appearance of a law enforcement officer, refuses to identify himself or herself, or manifestly endeavors to conceal himself or herself or any object.  Unless flight by the person or other circumstance makes it impracticable, a law enforcement officer shall, prior to any arrest for the offense of loitering or prowling, afford the person an opportunity to dispel any alarm or immediate concern which would otherwise be warranted by requesting the person to identify himself or herself and explain his or her presence and conduct.  No person shall be convicted of loitering or prowling if the law enforcement officer did not comply with this procedure or if it appears at trial that the explanation given by the person is true and, if believed by the officer at the time, would have dispelled the alarm or immediate concern.

Carrying a concealed weapon

It is unlawful for a person to carry a concealed weapon or electric weapon or device on or about his or her person unless that person is properly licensed to carry a concealed weapon or the weapon is authorized to be carried in a concealed manner pursuant to Florida Statute section 790.01.  Concealed weapon means any dirk, metallic knuckles, slung shot, billie, teargas gun, chemical weapon or device, or other deadly weapon carried on or about a person in such a manner as to conceal the weapon from the ordinary sight of another person. Carrying a concealed weapon is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 1 year in jail and/or 1 year on probation and/or a $1,000 fine.

Carrying a concealed firearm

It is unlawful for a person to carry a concealed firearm on or about his or her person unless that person is properly licensed to carry a concealed firearm pursuant to Florida Statute section 790.06.  A concealed firearm is any firearm which is carried on or about a person in such a manner as to conceal the firearm from the ordinary sight of another person.  A firearm is any weapon (including a starter gun) which will, is designed to, or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive; the frame or receiver of any such weapon; any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; any destructive device; or any machine gun.  The term “firearm” does not include an antique firearm unless the antique firearm is used in the commission of a crime.  Carrying a concealed firearm is a third-degree felony punishable by a maximum of 5 years in prison and/or 5 years probation and/or a $5,000 fine.

Carrying a concealed firearm in a place prohibited by law

It is unlawful for a person to openly carry a handgun or carry a concealed weapon or firearm into any place of nuisance as defined in Florida Statute section 823.05; any police sheriff, or highway patrol station; any detention facility, prison or jail; any courthouse; any courtroom; any polling place; any meeting of the governing body of a county, public school district; municipality or special district; any meeting of the Legislature or a committee thereof; any school, college or professional athletic event not related to firearms; any elementary or secondary school facility or administration building; any career center; any portion of an establishment licensed to dispense alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, any college or university; the inside of the passenger terminal and sterile area of any airport; or any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law. Carrying a firearm in place prohibited by law is a second-degree misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 60 days in jail and/or 6 months probation and/or a $500 fine.

Dealing in Stolen Property

Any person who traffics in, or endeavors to traffic in, property that he or she knows or should know was stolen shall be guilty of a second-degree felony punishable by a maximum of 15 years in prison and/or 15 years probation and/or a $10,000 fine.

False Verification

Any person who knowingly gives false verification of ownership or who gives a false or altered identification, and who receives money from a secondhand dealer for goods sold, consigned, or traded commits:

(a) If the value of the money received is less than $300, a felony of the third degree, punishable by up to 5 years in prison and/or 5 years probation and/or a $5,000 fine

(b) If the value of the money received is $300 or more, a felony of the second degree, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and/or 15 years probation and/or a $10,000 fine

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