Orlando Leaving The Scene Of An Accident Defense Lawyer

If you have been charged with leaving the scene of an accident in Orlando please contact Chris S. Boatright, P.A. at 407-740-8300 to discuss what options may be available to get your leaving the scene of an accident charge dismissed or reduced.  A conviction for leaving the scene of an accident with property damage or leaving the scene of an accident with injuries will cause 6 points to be placed on your driving record.  

Former Leaving The Scene Of An Accident Prosecutor

As a former leaving the scene of an accident prosecutor Chris has an understanding of what can be important to the prosecutor in your Orlando leaving the scene of an accident case.  It is important to understand how the other side works.  Chris uses this understanding to determine what needs to be done to get the best possible outcome in your leaving the scene of an accident case.  

Orlando Leaving The Scene Of An Accident Defense Lawyer Since 1999

Chris has been defending individuals in Orlando charged with leaving the scene of an accident since 1999.  Being an Orlando leaving the scene of an accident defense lawyer for so long has given Chris the opportunity to spend a lot of time working with the judges and prosecutors in Orlando that handle leaving the scene of an accident cases like yours.  Experience dealing with those judges and prosecutors is important in achieving the best results in your leaving the scene of an accident case.  

Different Orlando Leaving The Scene Of An Accident Defense Lawyers Get Different Results

When you have been charged with leaving the scene of an accident in Orlando you need an aggressive, experienced, and knowledgeable lawyer like Chris to defend you.  A leaving the scene of an accident conviction will stay on your record forever, therefore, it is important to be represented by the right lawyer.  The better prepared you are for your court appearance the more likely it is you will get a favorable outcome.  The best results possible are rarely obtained by just hoping for them.  Get the help you need at Chris S. Boatright, P.A. to get the best results possible.  

Information About Orlando Leaving The Scene Of An Accident Charges

There are two types of leaving the scene of an accident charges, with property damage and with injuries. Leaving the scene of an accident with property damage is a misdemeanor. Leaving the scene of an accident with injuries is a felony. 

Leaving The Scene Of An Accident With Property Damage

The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash resulting only in damage to a vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall immediately stop such vehicle at the scene of such crash or as close thereto as possible, and shall forthwith return to, and in every event shall remain at, the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of Florida Statute section 316.062. Leaving the scene of an accident is a second-degree misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 60 days in jail and/or 6 months probation and/or a $500 fine in addition to a mandatory 6 points on your driving record.

Leaving The Scene Of An Accident With Injuries

The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash occurring on public or private property that results in injury of any person must immediately stop the vehicle at the scene, or as close thereto as possible, and must remain at the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of Florida Statute section 316.062.  Leaving the scene of an accident with injuries is a third-degree felony punishable by a maximum of 5 years in prison and/or 5 years probation and/or a $5,000 fine and a 1 year mandatory loss of your driving privileges.

316.061 Crashes involving damage to vehicle or property.—

(1) The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash resulting only in damage to a vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall immediately stop such vehicle at the scene of such crash or as close thereto as possible, and shall forthwith return to, and in every event shall remain at, the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of Florida Statute 316.062. A person who violates this subsection commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082 or Florida Statute 775.083. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, $5 shall be added to a fine imposed pursuant to this section, which $5 shall be deposited in the Emergency Medical Services Trust Fund.

(2) Every stop must be made without obstructing traffic more than is necessary, and, if a damaged vehicle is obstructing traffic, the driver of such vehicle must make every reasonable effort to move the vehicle or have it moved so as not to block the regular flow of traffic. Any person failing to comply with this subsection shall be cited for a nonmoving violation, punishable as provided in chapter 318.

(3) Employees or authorized agents of the Department of Transportation, law enforcement with proper jurisdiction, or an expressway authority created pursuant to chapter 348, in the exercise, management, control, and maintenance of its highway system, may undertake the removal from the main traveled way of roads on its highway system of all vehicles incapacitated as a result of a motor vehicle crash and of debris caused thereby. Such removal is applicable when such a motor vehicle crash results only in damage to a vehicle or other property, and when such removal can be accomplished safely and will result in the improved safety or convenience of travel upon the road. The driver or any other person who has removed a motor vehicle from the main traveled way of the road as provided in this section shall not be considered liable or at fault regarding the cause of the accident solely by reason of moving the vehicle.

316.062 Duty to give information and render aid.—

(1) The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash resulting in injury to or death of any person or damage to any vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall give his or her name, address, and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, and shall upon request and if available exhibit his or her license or permit to drive, to any person injured in such crash or to the driver or occupant of or person attending any vehicle or other property damaged in the crash and shall give such information and, upon request, exhibit such license or permit to any police officer at the scene of the crash or who is investigating the crash and shall render to any person injured in the crash reasonable assistance, including the carrying, or the making of arrangements for the carrying, of such person to a physician, surgeon, or hospital for medical or surgical treatment if it is apparent that treatment is necessary, or if such carrying is requested by the injured person.

(2) In the event none of the persons specified are in condition to receive the information to which they otherwise would be entitled under subsection (1), and no police officer is present, the driver of any vehicle involved in such crash, after fulfilling all other requirements of Florida Statute 316.027 and subsection (1), insofar as possible on his or her part to be performed, shall forthwith report the crash to the nearest office of a duly authorized police authority and submit thereto the information specified in subsection (1).

(3) The statutory duty of a person to make a report or give information to a law enforcement officer making a written report relating to a crash shall not be construed as extending to information which would violate the privilege of such person against self-incrimination.

(4) A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

316.063 Duty upon damaging unattended vehicle or other property.—

(1) The driver of any vehicle which collides with, or is involved in a crash with, any vehicle or other property which is unattended, resulting in any damage to such other vehicle or property, shall immediately stop and shall then and there either locate and notify the operator or owner of the vehicle or other property of the driver’s name and address and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, or shall attach securely in a conspicuous place in or on the vehicle or other property a written notice giving the driver’s name and address and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, and shall without unnecessary delay notify the nearest office of a duly authorized police authority. Any person who fails to comply with this subsection commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in Flroida Statute 775.082 or Florida Statute 775.083.

(2) Every such stop shall be made without obstructing traffic more than is necessary. If a damaged vehicle is obstructing traffic, the driver shall make every reasonable effort to move the vehicle or have it moved so as not to obstruct the regular flow of traffic. A violation of this subsection is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

(3) The law enforcement officer at the scene of a crash required to be reported in accordance with the provisions of subsection (1) or the law enforcement officer receiving a report by a driver as required by subsection (1) shall, if part or any of the property damaged is a fence or other structure used to house or contain livestock, promptly make a reasonable effort to notify the owner, occupant, or agent of this damage.

316.064 When driver unable to report.—

(1) A crash report is not required under this chapter from any person who is physically incapable of making a report during the period of such incapacity.

(2) Whenever the driver of a vehicle is physically incapable of making an immediate or a written report of a crash, as required in Florida Statute 316.065 and Florida Statute 316.066, and there was another occupant in the vehicle at the time of the crash capable of making a report, such occupant shall make or cause to be made the report not made by the driver.

(3) Whenever the driver is physically incapable of making a written report of a crash as required in this chapter, then the owner of the vehicle involved in the crash shall, within 10 days after the crash, make such report not made by the driver.

(4) A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

316.065 Crashes; reports; penalties.—

(1) The driver of a vehicle involved in a crash resulting in injury to or death of any persons or damage to any vehicle or other property in an apparent amount of at least $500 shall immediately by the quickest means of communication give notice of the crash to the local police department, if such crash occurs within a municipality; otherwise, to the office of the county sheriff or the nearest office or station of the Florida Highway Patrol. A violation of this subsection is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

(2) Every coroner or other official performing like functions, upon learning of the death of a person in his or her jurisdiction as the result of a traffic crash, shall immediately notify the nearest office or station of the department.

(3) Any person in charge of any garage or repair shop to which is brought any motor vehicle which shows evidence of having been struck by a bullet, or any other person to whom is brought for the purpose of repair a motor vehicle showing such evidence, shall make a report, or cause a report to be made, to the nearest local police station or Florida Highway Patrol office within 24 hours after the motor vehicle is received and before any repairs are made to the vehicle. The report shall contain the year, license number, make, model, and color of the vehicle and the name and address of the owner or person in possession of the vehicle.

(4) Any person who knowingly repairs a motor vehicle without having made a report as required by subsection (3) is guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082or Florida Statute 775.083. The owner and driver of a vehicle involved in a crash who makes a report thereof in accordance with subsection (1) is not liable under this section.

316.066 Written reports of crashes.—

(1)(a) A Florida Traffic Crash Report, Long Form must be completed and submitted to the department within 10 days after an investigation is completed by the law enforcement officer who in the regular course of duty investigates a motor vehicle crash that:

1. Resulted in death of, personal injury to, or any indication of complaints of pain or discomfort by any of the parties or passengers involved in the crash;

2. Involved a violation of Florida Statute 316.061(1) or Florida Statute 316.193;

3. Rendered a vehicle inoperable to a degree that required a wrecker to remove it from the scene of the crash; or

4. Involved a commercial motor vehicle.

(b) The Florida Traffic Crash Report, Long Form must include:

1. The date, time, and location of the crash.

2. A description of the vehicles involved.

3. The names and addresses of the parties involved, including all drivers and passengers, and the identification of the vehicle in which each was a driver or a passenger.

4. The names and addresses of witnesses.

5. The name, badge number, and law enforcement agency of the officer investigating the crash.

6. The names of the insurance companies for the respective parties involved in the crash.

(c) In any crash for which a Florida Traffic Crash Report, Long Form is not required by this section and which occurs on the public roadways of this state, the law enforcement officer shall complete a short-form crash report or provide a driver exchange-of-information form, to be completed by all drivers and passengers involved in the crash, which requires the identification of each vehicle that the drivers and passengers were in. The short-form report must include:

1. The date, time, and location of the crash.

2. A description of the vehicles involved.

3. The names and addresses of the parties involved, including all drivers and passengers, and the identification of the vehicle in which each was a driver or a passenger.

4. The names and addresses of witnesses.

5. The name, badge number, and law enforcement agency of the officer investigating the crash.

6. The names of the insurance companies for the respective parties involved in the crash.

(d) Each party to the crash must provide the law enforcement officer with proof of insurance, which must be documented in the crash report. If a law enforcement officer submits a report on the crash, proof of insurance must be provided to the officer by each party involved in the crash. Any party who fails to provide the required information commits a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318, unless the officer determines that due to injuries or other special circumstances such insurance information cannot be provided immediately. If the person provides the law enforcement agency, within 24 hours after the crash, proof of insurance that was valid at the time of the crash, the law enforcement agency may void the citation.

(e) The driver of a vehicle that was in any manner involved in a crash resulting in damage to a vehicle or other property which does not require a law enforcement report shall, within 10 days after the crash, submit a written report of the crash to the department. The report shall be submitted on a form approved by the department.

(f) Long-form and short-form crash reports prepared by law enforcement must be submitted to the department and may be maintained by the law enforcement officer’s agency.

(2)(a) Crash reports that reveal the identity, home or employment telephone number or home or employment address of, or other personal information concerning the parties involved in the crash and that are held by any agency that regularly receives or prepares information from or concerning the parties to motor vehicle crashes are confidential and exempt from Florida Statute 119.07(1) and s. 24(a), Art. I of the State Constitution for a period of 60 days after the date the report is filed.

(b) Crash reports held by an agency under paragraph (a) may be made immediately available to the parties involved in the crash, their legal representatives, their licensed insurance agents, their insurers or insurers to which they have applied for coverage, persons under contract with such insurers to provide claims or underwriting information, prosecutorial authorities, law enforcement agencies, the Department of Transportation, county traffic operations, victim services programs, radio and television stations licensed by the Federal Communications Commission, newspapers qualified to publish legal notices under Florida Statute 50.011 and Florida Statute 50.031, and, in accordance with paragraph (f), free newspapers of general circulation, published once a week or more often, of which at least 7,500 copies are distributed by mail or by carrier as verified by a postal statement or by a notarized printer’s statement of press run, which are intended to be generally distributed and circulated, and which contain news of general interest with at least 10 pages per publication, available and of interest to the public generally for the dissemination of news. For the purposes of this section, the following products or publications are not newspapers as referred to in this section: those intended primarily for members of a particular profession or occupational group; those with the primary purpose of distributing advertising; and those with the primary purpose of publishing names and other personal identifying information concerning parties to motor vehicle crashes.

(c) Any local, state, or federal agency that is authorized to have access to crash reports by any provision of law shall be granted such access in the furtherance of the agency’s statutory duties.

(d) As a condition precedent to accessing a crash report within 60 days after the date the report is filed, a person must present a valid driver license or other photographic identification, proof of status, or identification that demonstrates his or her qualifications to access that information and file a written sworn statement with the state or local agency in possession of the information stating that information from a crash report made confidential and exempt by this section will not be used for any commercial solicitation of accident victims, or knowingly disclosed to any third party for the purpose of such solicitation, during the period of time that the information remains confidential and exempt. Such written sworn statement must be completed and sworn to by the requesting party for each individual crash report that is being requested within 60 days after the report is filed. In lieu of requiring the written sworn statement, an agency may provide crash reports by electronic means to third-party vendors under contract with one or more insurers, but only when such contract states that information from a crash report made confidential and exempt by this section will not be used for any commercial solicitation of accident victims by the vendors, or knowingly disclosed by the vendors to any third party for the purpose of such solicitation, during the period of time that the information remains confidential and exempt, and only when a copy of such contract is furnished to the agency as proof of the vendor’s claimed status.

(e) This subsection does not prevent the dissemination or publication of news to the general public by any legitimate media entitled to access confidential and exempt information pursuant to this section.

(f) Free newspapers of general circulation published once a week or more often, of which at least 7,500 copies are distributed by mail or by carrier as verified by a postal statement or by a notarized printer’s statement of press run, which are intended to be generally distributed and circulated, which contain news of general interest with at least 10 pages per publication, available and of interest to the public generally for the dissemination of news, and which request 10 or more crash reports within a 24-hour period before 60 days have elapsed after the report is filed may not have access to the home, cellular, employment, or other telephone number or the home or employment address of any of the parties involved in the crash. This paragraph is subject to the Open Government Sunset Review Act in accordance with Florida Statute 119.15 and shall stand repealed on October 2, 2019, unless reviewed and saved from repeal through reenactment by the Legislature.

(3)(a) Any driver failing to file the written report required under subsection (1) commits a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

(b) Any employee of a state or local agency in possession of information made confidential and exempt by this section who knowingly discloses such confidential and exempt information to a person not entitled to access such information under this section commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082, Florida Statute 775.083, or Florida Statute 775.084.

(c) Any person, knowing that he or she is not entitled to obtain information made confidential and exempt by this section, who obtains or attempts to obtain such information commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082, Florida Statute 775.083, or Florida Statute 775.084.

(d) Any person who knowingly uses confidential and exempt information in violation of a filed written sworn statement or contractual agreement required by this section commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082, Florida Statute 775.083, or Florida Statute 775.084.

(4) Except as specified in this subsection, each crash report made by a person involved in a crash and any statement made by such person to a law enforcement officer for the purpose of completing a crash report required by this section shall be without prejudice to the individual so reporting. Such report or statement may not be used as evidence in any trial, civil or criminal. However, subject to the applicable rules of evidence, a law enforcement officer at a criminal trial may testify as to any statement made to the officer by the person involved in the crash if that person’s privilege against self-incrimination is not violated. The results of breath, urine, and blood tests administered as provided in Florida Statute 316.1932 or Florida Statute 316.1933 are not confidential and are admissible into evidence in accordance with the provisions of Florida Statute 316.1934(2).

(5) A law enforcement officer, as defined in Florida Statute 943.10(1), may enforce this section.

316.067 False reports.—Any person who gives information in oral, electronic, or written reports as required in this chapter, knowing or having reason to believe that such information is false, commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082 or Florida Statute 775.083.

316.027 Crash involving death or personal injuries.—

(1) As used in this section, the term:

(a) “Serious bodily injury” means an injury to a person, including the driver, which consists of a physical condition that creates a substantial risk of death, serious personal disfigurement, or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member or organ.

(b) “Vulnerable road user” means:

1. A pedestrian, including a person actually engaged in work upon a highway, or in work upon utility facilities along a highway, or engaged in the provision of emergency services within the right-of-way;

2. A person operating a bicycle, motorcycle, scooter, or moped lawfully on the roadway;

3. A person riding an animal; or

4. A person lawfully operating on a public right-of-way, crosswalk, or shoulder of the roadway:

a. A farm tractor or similar vehicle designed primarily for farm use;

b. A skateboard, roller skates, or in-line skates;

c. A horse-drawn carriage;

d. An electric personal assistive mobility device; or

e. A wheelchair.

(2)(a) The driver of a vehicle involved in a crash occurring on public or private property which results in injury to a person other than serious bodily injury shall immediately stop the vehicle at the scene of the crash, or as close thereto as possible, and shall remain at the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of Florida Statute 316.062. A person who willfully violates this paragraph commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082, Florida Statute 775.083, or Florida Statute 775.084.

(b) The driver of a vehicle involved in a crash occurring on public or private property which results in serious bodily injury to a person shall immediately stop the vehicle at the scene of the crash, or as close thereto as possible, and shall remain at the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of Florida Statute 316.062. A person who willfully violates this paragraph commits a felony of the second degree, punishable as provided in Florida Statute 775.082, Florida Statute 775.083, or Florida Statute 775.084.

(c) The driver of a vehicle involved in a crash occurring on public or private property which results in the death of a person shall immediately stop the vehicle at the scene of the crash, or as close thereto as possible, and shall remain at the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of Florida Statute 316.062. A person who is arrested for a violation of this paragraph and who has previously been convicted of a violation of this section, Florida Statute 316.061, Florida Statute 316.191, or Florida Statute 316.193, or a felony violation of Florida Statute 322.34, shall be held in custody until brought before the court for admittance to bail in accordance with chapter 903. A person who willfully violates this paragraph commits a felony of the first degree, punishable as provided inFlorida Statute 775.082, Florida Statute 775.083, or Florida Statute 775.084, and shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 4 years. A person who willfully commits such a violation while driving under the influence as set forth in Florida Statute 316.193(1) shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 4 years.

(d) Notwithstanding Florida Statute 775.089(1)(a), if the driver of a vehicle violates paragraph (a), paragraph (b), or paragraph (c), the court shall order the driver to make restitution to the victim for any damage or loss unless the court finds clear and compelling reasons not to order the restitution. Restitution may be monetary or nonmonetary restitution. The court shall make the payment of restitution a condition of probation in accordance with Florida Statute 948.03. An order requiring the defendant to make restitution to a victim does not remove or diminish the requirement that the court order payment to the Crimes Compensation Trust Fund under chapter 960. Payment of an award by the Crimes Compensation Trust Fund creates an order of restitution to the Crimes Compensation Trust Fund unless specifically waived in accordance with Florida Statute 775.089(1)(b).

(e) A driver who violates paragraph (a), paragraph (b), or paragraph (c) shall have his or her driver license revoked for at least 3 years as provided in Florida Statute 322.28(4).

1. A person convicted of violating paragraph (a), paragraph (b), or paragraph (c) shall, before his or her driving privilege may be reinstated, present to the department proof of completion of a victim’s impact panel session in a judicial circuit if such a panel exists, or if such a panel does not exist, a department-approved driver improvement course relating to the rights of vulnerable road users relative to vehicles on the roadway as provided in Florida Statute 322.0261(2).

2. The department may reinstate an offender’s driving privilege after he or she satisfies the 3-year revocation period as provided in Florida Statute 322.28(4) and successfully completes either a victim’s impact panel session or a department-approved driver improvement course relating to the rights of vulnerable road users relative to vehicles on the roadway as provided in Florida Statute 322.0261(2).

3. For purposes of this paragraph, an offender’s driving privilege may be reinstated only after the department verifies that the offender participated in and successfully completed a victim’s impact panel session or a department-approved driver improvement course.

(f) For purposes of sentencing under chapter 921 and determining incentive gain-time eligibility under chapter 944, an offense listed in this subsection is ranked one level above the ranking specified in Florida Statute 921.0022 or Florida Statute 921.0023 for the offense committed if the victim of the offense was a vulnerable road user.

(g) The defendant may move to depart from the mandatory minimum term of imprisonment prescribed in paragraph (c) unless the violation was committed while the defendant was driving under the influence. The state may object to this departure. The court may grant the motion only if it finds that a factor, consideration, or circumstance clearly demonstrates that imposing a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment would constitute or result in an injustice. The court shall state in open court the basis for granting the motion.

(3) The stops shall be made without unnecessarily obstructing traffic, and, if a damaged vehicle is obstructing traffic, the driver of the vehicle shall make every reasonable effort to move the vehicle or have it moved so as not to obstruct the regular flow of traffic. A person who fails to comply with this subsection shall be cited for a nonmoving violation, punishable as provided in chapter 318.

(4) In addition to any other civil, criminal, or administrative penalty imposed, a person whose commission of a noncriminal traffic infraction or a violation of this chapter or Florida Statute 1006.66 causes or results in the death of another person may be required by the court to serve 120 community service hours in a trauma center or hospital that regularly receives victims of vehicle accidents, under the supervision of a registered nurse, an emergency room physician, or an emergency medical technician pursuant to a voluntary community service program operated by the trauma center or hospital.

(5) This section does not apply to crashes occurring during a motorsports event, as defined in Florida Statute 549.10(1), or at a closed-course motorsport facility, as defined in Florida Statute 549.09(1).

Evidence

In order for the State of Florida to prove you committed the crime of leaving the scene of an accident, the State need’s evidence.  Normally, the law enforcement officer’s report contains a statement of the evidence against you.  However, there may be other evidence in your case which the law enforcement officer failed to document in the report.  It is essential for you and your attorney to review all of the evidence in your case before preparing your defense.  Some important questions are:

  • Were there any witnesses to the incident and if so did they provide a statement?
  • Can anyone identify you as the driver?
  • Did you cause property damage or injuries?
  • Did you know there was property damage or injuries?

Constitutional Rights

The United States Constitution and the Florida Constitution both guarantee that people be free from self-incrimination.  In order for a person to give up their privilege against self-incrimination the person must do so freely voluntarily and knowingly and that is why a person is normally advised of their Miranda rights after arrest but prior to any questioning by a law enforcement officer.  It is important for you to know if your privilege against self-incrimination was violated.  If your privilege against self-incrimination was violated evidence in your case may be inadmissible.  Some important questions to consider are:

  • Were you questioned by a law enforcement officer after you were arrested?
  • Did you make any statements that are harmful to your case?
  • Were you read your Miranda rights?

Orlando Leaving The Scene Of An Accident Penalties

Some of the other penalties for a leaving the scene of an accident may include:

  • Community Service
  • Classes
  • Cost of Investigation
  • Cost of Prosecution
  • Court Costs
Free Consultation
Call now!
(407) 740-8300

Available 24/7.
Click here for a free email case evaluation 24/7.